Alcohol Consumption Associated With Changes In Oral Microbiome, Study Suggests

A recent study conducted on a large population of American adults suggests that alcohol consumption kills the “good” bacteria in the mouth, and allows the “bad” bacteria to thrive, which could be potentially harmful. The study published in the journal Microbiome found “people who drank more had less abundant populations of Lactobacilli, so-called ‘good’ bacteria,” and…

The American Dream: Dr. Jacinthe Paquette – Her Story

Dr. Jacinthe M. Paquette is President of the American Academy of Esthetic Dentistry, Past President of the Pacific Coast Society of Prosthodontics, and serves on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Dr. Paquette is recognized nationally and internationally as a leader and educator in Esthetic Dentistry, Prosthodontics, and Implant Dentistry. She is…

A Stronger Link Between Periodontitis and Cancer

According to a new long-term health study at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Kimmel Cancer Center, additional and stronger evidence has been provided between advanced gum disease and increased risk of cancer. The study was published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute in January 2018. The data used was from…

Potential Impact of Bacteria on Tooth Decay

Dental tooth decay is the most common childhood disease. Researchers at the University of Minnesota have recently discovered bacteria that absorb and accumulate phosphate from saliva, which may play a role in tooth decay and cavities. A study was published based on this research in Applies and Environmental Biology, which suggests that dental plaque contributes…

Connection Between Oral Diseases and Childhood Obesity?

Studies are beginning to link the prevalence of childhood obesity with oral diseases, both of which are associated with negative health and psycho-social status. According to an article from the Medical News Bulletin, ” oral diseases may contribute to chewing problems, which translate into dietary problems. Children with missing or painful teeth may avoid nutritional foods,…

New Dental Survey Reveals: Why We Aren’t Going to The Dentist!

A recent dental survey reveals that 30% of Millennials brush their teeth only once per day….and also reveals why they may not be going to the dentist! The fear of drill noises and painful treatment are common “dentist anxieties”, however all of these fears can be eliminated with the right dental care. Ask your dentist…

Immune Deficiency Explains Rampant Caries in Children

A new discovery by researchers at Umea University in Sweden has connected genetic immune deficiencies to rampant caries and increased risk of dental caries affecting about 1 in 5 children. According to the study published in EBioMedicine, These findings could lead to a more efficient way to diagnose high-risk patients and treat the caries early…

Sugar Industry Manipulated Science To Protect Interests

According a a University of California San Francisco study published November 2017 in PLOS Biology, the sugar industry has hidden evidence of the negative health effects of sugar from research conducted almost 50 years ago. The research was no longer funded once the studies indicated negative health consequences of sucrose. The study was being funded…

Is Sparkling Water Bad For My Teeth?

Acidity and tooth enamel don’t exactly go hand-in-hand… Carbonated beverages have higher acid levels, but what does this mean for your teeth? Read the full article to find out if your favorite carbonated beverages are putting your teeth at risk: https://goo.gl/FfrA2v     **Source: MouthHealthy.org by the American Dental Association (ADA)

6 Ways To Make Your Mouth Extra Kissable For Valentine’s Day

A kiss is more than just a kiss! Before you get too close to your significant other this year, here’s what you need to know about keeping your mouth healthy: Read the full article at: https://goo.gl/PHQqiU   **From mouthhealthy.org brought to you by the American Dental Association (ADA)

Research may explain why gum disease is linked to heart problems

Heart disease and fatty clogs in the arteries go hand in hand. But new evidence suggests the fatty molecules might come not only from what you eat, but from the bacteria in your mouth, report UConn scientists in the 16 August issue of the Journal of Lipid Research. The research may explain why gum disease is…

Bacteria in Mouth Tied to Esophageal Cancer

Bacteria in your mouth may either raise or lower your risk for esophageal cancer, according to a study conducted at NYU Langone Health’s Perlmutter Cancer Center. Researchers analyzed data from two national studies involving more than 120,000 patients. They found that the presence of a bacteria called Tannerella forsythia that’s commonly linked to gum disease,…